King v. Burwell: The stakes are too high!

This case jeopardizes the vision of affordable, quality healthcare for all Americans and challenges the tax credits available through the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that millions of working families depend upon to purchase lower-cost health insurance. This politically motivated case could threaten the overall health and financial security of millions of working people in some 36 states and turn back the gains made in improving access to care.

If extremists win in King v. Burwell, millions of Americans' healthcare is at stake/

Registered nurses, doctors and healthcare workers from cities and towns across America and ordinary working Americans have joined SEIU in filing an amicus brief that reveals how the tax credits have helped them, their loved ones, or their patients to afford healthcare coverage, and, subsequently, afford long overdue preventive care and treatment of chronic conditions.

Listen to Sue Morano, RN from 1199WOK, Michelle Boyle RN, from HCPA, and Melanie Arciaga, RN of 1199NW in their radio news releases that reached over 2,222,197 over 309 stations: Click here for audio clip.

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Here are a few personal stories.

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Thumbnail image for Claudette.jpgClaudette Newsome, a mother of two school-aged girls in Houston, yearned for the security of affordable healthcare after her husband lost his life to cancer at 46. Now receiving $180 per month in tax credits, she joined 11 other consumers and SEIU Healthcare members in filing an amicus brief that calls on the Supreme Court to consider what’s at stake.

Read Claudette’s story.

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Deb.jpgDeborah McBee, 63, and her husband Burrett both got health coverage for years through their jobs. When they both changed jobs, however, they lost their insurance and understood for the first time just how outrageous healthcare costs are in the United States. Thanks to the tax credits under the ACA, their premium payments decreased by $200 per month. But now those savings are at risk inKing v. Burwell–and Deb doesn’t want to have to hold her breath until she qualifies for Medicare, should she once again be unable to afford to pay for healthcare.

Read Deborah’s story.

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C-ATL.jpgChrysandra Roland, a 66-year-old secretary in the neonatal intensive care unit at the Atlanta Medical Center, says access to quality healthcare has always been a top issue in the African American community. However, in just two years, she has seen the healthcare law make some great strides in helping to address this: The number of people who are insured is at an all-time low and nowhere has this been more apparent than in communities of color.

Read Chrysandra’s story.

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MicheleE.jpgMichele Evans, a small business owner in Montana, runs two businesses and was uninsured for years before the ACA was passed. If there’s an unfavorable decision in the King v. Burwellcase, Michelle could lose her $850 subsidy and would almost surely go back to being uninsured. There are thousands of families like hers who would likely find themselves in the same situation.

Read Michele’s story.

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Janet.jpgJanet Wolfe is a healthcare worker who assists the elderly and the developmentally disabled. For years, Janet suffered through a lot of pain because she couldn’t get the hip surgery she needed since she didn’t have health insurance. In 2013, the tax credits in the ACA allowed her to buy health insurance for $254 per month and she was finallyable have her long-overdue hip surgery. She doesn’t want to go back to the time when tens of millions of working Americans couldn’t afford any health insurance whatsoever.

Read Janet’s story.

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MichelleBoyleblog.jpgMichelle Boyle, 44, is a registered nurse in the transplant unit of Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh. She knows the importance of access to affordable healthcare for her patients and from her personal experience of losing her mother-in-law of treatable chronic conditions at 58 because there were no affordable coverage options available. Michelle does not want to go back to being a country that does not provide for the sick.

Read Michelle’s story here.

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Marilyn2.jpgMarilyn Ralat Albernas is a post-partum nurse who’s seen noticeable improvements in babies’ health and the moms’ readiness to care for their little ones since the passage of the ACA. Women are also having more regular prenatal exams, ultrasounds to track fetal development, and are becoming better educated about caring for their baby following delivery, including the bond and nutritional benefits of breast feeding. As an RN, she does not want to see those care advances go away.

Read Marilyn’s story.

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Jay.jpgJay Joshi, a 60 year-old retired travel agent who lives in Richardson, Texas, remembers all too well the fear and guilt she had when she was the only one in her family with affordable coverage–citing the constant strain on her family’s well-being knowing that at any moment her husband could become seriously ill or they could be one random accident away from bankruptcy. Her family had no choice but to use their family visits to India to see a doctor there to get the healthcare her husband needed. She believes there’s too much at stake for our country to turn back now.

Read Jay’s story
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DrMarcus.jpgDr. Marcus Sandling is a third-year internal medical resident at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School who has been working to support the ACA since it was first passed into law. Since its passage, he’s seen chronic patients become proactive about preventive care. He’s also witnessed how much easier it becomes for patients to develop real, lasting relationships with their doctors when they can actually afford health insurance.

Read Dr. Sandling’s story.

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Rita2-10191897266_6d232e7d20_k.jpgRita Adamski is a home care worker and member of SEIU Local 503 in Salem, OR. Before she signed up for coverage under the ACA, more than 50% of her income was going towards health insurance, deductible and co-pays. Typically, she had to work eight days just to pay for her healthcare and when her premiums went up even more, she I had to drop my insurance altogether. Rita knows we can’t go back to a time when we lived with the burden of working just to pay for our healthcare and the fear of going bankrupt from an illness or injury.

Read Rita’s story.

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New polling shows a vast majority of Americans want ACA tax credits to be available inall 50 states.

There’s too much at stake in King v. Burwell for the high court to turn a blind eye to the very real consequences an adverse ruling would have on working families, our hospitals, and our communities.

Spread the word on Twitter and Facebook that healthcare is a human right, not just a privilege of the wealthy few, using hashtags #DontTakeMyCare and #KingvBurwell.

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